FAQs

Our most commonly asked questions are answered below, please get in touch if you need further assistance

Most frequent questions and answers

Some types of fungi can co-exist with trees for years but certain types will cause decay and will be detrimental to the health and mechanical integrity of the tree.
Ben is a Lantra qualified professional tree inspector and will be able to advise you on the best course of action for your particular tree(s).
If your tree is near a building, public access areas or other targets where failure of that tree would cause harm or damage, you (the tree owner) have a duty of care, written in law, to ensure that persons or property are not at risk from your tree.

Written permission must be gained from the local planning authority to undertake works on a tree with a TPO. This can be applied for via the Planning Portal.

There are exceptions to this rule including; if the tree is dead or the tree is an immediate safety risk. In this case a ‘five day notice’ can be submitted to the planning authority which outlines the works that you intend to carry out.

Tree owners are liable for a fine if they do not comply with the regulations, we can advise you on how to apply for the correct permissions and submit an application on your behalf if you wish.

Further information on TPO rules can be found here.

In this case (if your tree is not also protected by an existing TPO), the local planning authority must be given at least 6 weeks’ notice of the intended works. This can be done via the Planning Portal.

The local planning authority will consider if they wish to make a tree preservation order to prevent the works, if they give written acceptance of the proposal or once 6 weeks have passed from submission date you may proceed with the works.

Tree owners are liable for a fine if they do not comply with the regulations, we can advise you on how to submit an application on your behalf if you wish.

Further information on Conservation Area rules can be found here.

Yes, you can keep the arisings if you wish or we can quote to remove them from site as part of the works.  We recycle as much of our green waste as possible.

If you have a log burner or open fire you may want your timber logged and split, we have a petrol log splitter and can quote for this as an additional service.

Gallery of Fungi

Below is a selection of common fungi which are associated with decay in trees

Professiona Tree Survey May Ben Mason ARB Professional Tree Surgeons
Meripilus giganteus ~ Giant Polypore

This fungus can grow to an

enormous size, causes decay

of the roots which is hard to

detect and it is often

associated with the wind

throw of trees

Sparassis crispa - Cauliflower fungus
Sparissis Crispa - Cauliflower Fungus

Another fungus associated

with root decay but this one is

only associated with conifers

Kretzschmaria Deusta
Kretzschmaria Deusta

Easily missed by the

untrained eye, this fungus

first appears as a grey crust

with white edges, later turning

black. It causes soft rot

initially and later white rot

‘There are several different species of Ganoderma, similar but with their own characteristics. The fungal fruiting bodies initially emerge as a white blob, developing into a hard bracket fungus. The heartwood of the host tree will be hollowed out by Ganoderma species.’
Ganoderma species

There are several different species of Ganoderma,

similar but with their own characteristics.

The fungal fruiting bodies initially emerge as a white

blob,developing into a hard bracket fungus.

The heartwood of the host tree will be

hollowed out by Ganoderma species.